Polyphony - Without Introduction. 1972 USA

Polyphony are a complex and intense American progressive rock band from Virginia Beach, Virginia. Without Introduction brings forth an enormous amount of energy. Loud guitar, shredding organ, two hyperactive percussionists, and hazy psychedelic vocals is what you'll find here. ELP's Tarkus suite seems to be the main influence here, with a bit more of that American rough and tough edge, not to mentioned the heavy guitar presence. 'Juggernaut' is the pick of the litter, but the entire 37 minutes is well spent. I've always found it a bit surprising this album isn't more revered, as I find it among America's finest progressive rock albums from the early 1970s along with Metaphysical Animation and Ram's Where In Conclusion.

Personal collection
LP: 1972 Eleventh Hour
CD: 2011 Belle Antique

For years this album had more boots than a shoe store. I ultimately plunked down some serious coin for an original LP, which is certainly worth it when you consider the artwork of the cover. Plus it sounds great! The Gear Fab CD finally gave the album a legitimate release. It's obviously taken from vinyl (masters are long gone) that inexplicably skips the first 10 second or so, and the overall package is typical of Gear Fab: Single tray card with liners... and that's it. But at least those notes cleared up the date issue, stating it was from 1972 rather than the assumed 1971. My guess is they were printed up before they received Glenn Howard's liners. Mike Diana's story corroborates the 1972 date. But it's legit and we'll take what we can.

2016 update: I've also since picked up the Belle Antique CD version. The good news is that even though Belle Antique licensed it from Gear Fab, they did remaster the contents, and fixed the screw-ups that Gear Fab produced. And with the beautiful cover reproduced precisely, I would recommend this as the CD route to go.

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