The Trip - Caronte. 1971 Italy

The Trip were formed in London in the mid 60s and at one point had a young guitarist named Ritchie Blackmore in its stable. So not exactly your normal Italian prog rock pedigree. And as such, The Trip were always outliers in the evaluation of great bands from Italy. To best appreciate The Trip, one needs to take in account the western European landscape of whatever was popular at the time of release. Up-front organ rock was quite popular in Germany and England in 1971, and that's exactly the sound you'll find here on the mostly instrumental Caronte. Anywhere between Atomic Rooster and Orange Peel, one will spot the sounds found here. Hammond organ, loud guitar, experimental bits, a jammin' and a rockin'. Not entirely an unknown sound in Italy in 1971, as one could also point to the New Trolls and Le Orme for doing similar. Le Orme's Collage in particular was the band's own odd album out, with a strong Krautrock influence, though they also sung in the native tongue and had began to look inward to what was happening back at home. Not The Trip however. So if you love 1971 era hard driving progressive rock (and who doesn't?) - but foreign languages and indigenous sounds turn you off - then The Trip's Caronte will likely be one of your favorites from "The Boot".

Personal collection
LP: 1990 RCA / Contempo
CD: 2008 Sony

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