Saturday, March 4, 2017

Full Moon - Euphoria. 1992 England

Full Moon - Euphoria. 1992 Demi Monde

CD issue: 1992 Demi Monde

Now here's an interesting title. I first read about this album in Freakbeat circa 1993. And have been looking for a copy on CD ever since. While not a common title on LP, the CD seemingly disappeared without a trace the minute it was released. While by no means was I actively seeking the title out, it's one that never managed to waft under my nose either. Until 24 years later when one did flash before my eyes. And I secured it. On the cheap minimum bid presumably since no one even knew what it was!

Was it worth seeking? Oh heck yea! There's quite a bit of misinformation regarding this album, and if it were not for that Freakbeat review, which I still have, I would probably have given up search long ago. Let's be clear here, this is no heavy metal album. I believe their debut, which I haven't heard, was more geared that way, so assumptions have been made toward this release. No, this one is square-on UK Festival Psych music. For anyone that is familiar with Soma, Strobe, or early Mandragora, you will recognize the sound here immediately. Hawkwind is the main driver rather than Here and Now or Gong. There's the pulverizing space rock motif with monotone English styled vocals that was prevalent back then. In other places, there are exotic Middle Eastern psychedelic jam sequences with some splendid lead guitar. And yes, there is a bit of heavy metal, in that epic style you might associate a band like Manilla Road with. The sound isn't quite heavy enough to pull it off, but when mixed with the above psychedelia, it sounds awesome. This is not an album for fans strictly enamored with 70s music, it's very much a product of the early 90s. Full Moon's Euphoria is a bit incongruous with the festival scene of the day, making it that much more interesting 25 years later. An album that remains to be discovered.

2 comments:

  1. Had both the LP and CD upon release. Don't know, Full Moon never worked for me. At first the vocalist was disassociating the music from the festi-vibe towards neo-prog and 80s metal screaming and secondly the band was caught in an whirlwind of ambivalence concerning the musical direction they would be heading for. Sold both versions long, long ago, before they became scarce.

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    1. I figured you'd know them, Spyros! Probably I would have felt the same back then. Now I enjoy it for some reason. Hard to know why that is, exactly.

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